Where do I begin…

I feel like I am still spinning around wildly on that Merry-Go-Round, and my poor painted pony is running out of breath!  But I’m getting closer to the finish line, if that’s actually a thing.  Truth be told, I seriously doubt it!  

So I went off to Sievers.  Sievers is a wonderful fiber school on Washington Island, WI, and we determined this is my 13th year there.  I’m thinking 13 is a charm?  I had an uneventful trip there, made all my connections, bags were waiting cruising around the baggage carousel when I got off the plane in Green Bay.  The Sievers Staff sends someone to pick me up, we stop at a Walmart for my week of groceries and the all important box of wine, and off we go onto the ferry and my get away home for the week.

The weather was cold, and crisp, and some days bright and sunny, and other days, raining like the end of the world was coming.  It even snowed one day.  

Sunsets were beautiful, and I actually caught the moon peeking through some gorgeous cloud formations as I crossed the road to my cottage about 10:30 pm, leaving students still working, this is one committed group!

Sievers always sponsors a “Getting to know you” breakfast with all the students from both classes at one of the local breakfast places, this time the Sunset, and the beach outside the restaurant didn’t disappoint.

My class was amazing.  8 of the 12 students, really 9 of them had worked with me before, 2 at other venues, but all jumped in pretty quickly.  The remaining three were excited and kept up easily with the rest of my Sievers’ Achievers.  The space is glorious, well lit, lots of tables, and all important cutting tables that are always in demand.

The students took advantage of all of the patterns I now offer, many of them making multiple garments over the 7 day class.

Of course there are always my jacket people, Margaret, one of my new students, but a pretty experienced garment maker did a gorgeous collared jacket with bound buttonholes from a commercial wool.  Cindy D (there were three Cindy’s in the class) made a longer jacket with a neck band for her yardage she wove from a Blazing Shuttles Handpainted Warp.  She worked hard on the layout to get everything to line up.  

I had a lot of tunics happening in this class.  Cindy M made up a tunic in a commercial fabric she had laying around just to see how it all went together.  Linda made up a lovely tunic from a commercial fabric, and Janene made two tunics, the first one, in beautiful watery blue chenille handwoven with Zephyr wool/silk she cut out last year and never got a chance to make it up, so came to class and picked up where she left off.  The second one she made in a new handwoven cloth from a superwash handpainted knitting yarn.  This one she made with a button placket.  Helen also made a tunic out of contrasting quilt fabrics.

Helen was also one of my new students, and in addition to the tunic, she made a vest from her handwoven fabric.

Gerri made a vest from handwoven fabric, this was a commercial pattern we needed to alter a bit.  I love the contrasting band, also handwoven.

In addition, Gerri started in on the pattern and then the test garment, for probably the most unusual vest I’ve ever fit on anyone, from the Sewing Workshop, the Fillmore Vest.  She had some beautiful handwoven, which apparently I didn’t get a photo of, but once we tweaked the pattern, adding bust shaping, she got everything laid out and will cut and assemble at home.  Can’t wait to see photos of that finished.

Terry also made a vest, this one we created a pattern from a drawing she brought in to show the kind of vest she wanted to really show off these two cuts of wool she bought on a trip to Scotland.  She had a car full of gorgeous fabrics and started in on a swing dress/jumper, from one of my newest patterns.  I missed getting a photo on her, but at least I got one on the table showing off what a terrific match job she did on the plaid.

Dawn for her first project also made the dress.  And that gave her enough scraps to make the same vest that Helen made.

Cindy M also made the dress from an old fabric from the stash, working hard to get those red and white checks to match.

There is a pattern that has been shared around the class, many of the students have made it up multiple times.  The pattern I’m sure is no longer in print, but turns out I have a copy in my own stash of patterns, and so it is on my list to make one of these knit blouses too.  There is an interesting twist of the two fronts right at the bustline.  Linda and Cindy S both made knit blouses from Today’s Fit Vogue 1477.  

And then we have the new jacket, which is like my zippered vest with sleeves.  Dawn had planned to make it up, but had lots of tensioning issues with her handwoven fabric and kept cutting it off the loom when her tension went astray.  There was a bit of warp left on the loom, and she hoped that she could get the last sleeve out of it after she got home and finished weaving what was left.  She couldn’t quite get the jacket finished without the sleeve, since it is lined edge to edge and then the perimeter binding and zipper are applied.  A few days ago I got a text from Dawn showing me the remaining fabric is off the loom and with not a quarter inch to spare, it exactly fits the remaining sleeve!

The collared zip vest is fast becoming my most popular pattern.  Janene made one last year from a gorgeous handwoven from a Noro knitting yarn.  She brought it back because she wanted to alter it to create a side vent.  So of course everyone wanted that.  Ginnie made one from the fabric she wove with me in my designing yardage class back in July at Peters Valley.  And she made a vent too.

Cindy M also made a gorgeous vest from her handwoven, again, really spending time to get the panels to match as best she could.

And Cindy S brought her jacket she made last year, back to class because we could not get the collar right.  She had put bound buttonholes in my jacket collar to put onto a commercial jacket pattern she had used before, and for some reason, we just couldn’t get the collar to lay right.  We ran out of time last year, so she brought it back.  Turns out, there was an oops moment, when I removed the entire collar and we laid it out on the table, and discovered that the whole collar had been put on in reverse, the shawl edge against the body.  Which complicated things because the bound buttonholes were now on the outside edge instead of the inside edge.  With some tweaking and tiny seams, I managed to reverse everything and she got it all back together and once she puts the lining back in and finishes handsewing, and gives it a good pressing, the collar now does what it is supposed to do.

She went on to make a new jacket, this one also from handwoven, and after watching a video from an old Roberta Carr tutorial, inspired by a Threads Insider Video from Louise Cutting on Spanish Snap Buttonholes, she made one for this jacket.  Turned out perfectly.  I was peripherally aware of this technique, but will now make a garment with them and possibly use them for my closures lecture.  They are perfect for a thinner weight handwoven.  

And then there was Joy.  She sat quietly in her corner of the room, making a gorgeous black duster coat, using my long shawl collared jacket pattern from a commercial wool fabric.  Her line of bound buttonholes down the front turned out perfectly.  I can’t wait to see it finished with the lining installed and all the handwork done.

Here is my Sievers Achievers Class of 2019!  And we had great fun at our newest tradition, Monday night Island Pizza night, we get take out pizzas and bring the wine (and beer, this is after all Wisconsin!)

Speaking of Threads Insider, my latest video is up, this one on making a full bust adjustment.  Threads Insider is a subscription service, about $5. a month, and that gives you access to everything Threads, including all the videos, online archive and print magazine.  There is a 14 day free trial.  You can binge watch a lot of videos in 14 days!

And so I started the trek home on Wednesday around lunch time, knowing full well that there was a wicked storm on the east coast and that most likely I would not make it home and have to spend the night in O’Hare.  The ferry crossing to Door County Wisconsin was enough of a ride!  The water was rough, surf pounding and that tiny ship got tossed around!  I got to Green Bay early and was able to hop onto an earlier flight, which was boarding as I was going through the check in process, I was the last one on the plane, pretty sure my bags wouldn’t make it on with me.  

We made it to O’Hare, where the Club lounge ticket agent also put me on standby for an earlier flight, the trick was finding my bags and hoping they would make it on the earlier flight as well.  She knew they made it to O’Hare, and asked me to describe them.  Hahahahah!  Very very big and very very heavy.  Both were soft sided, zippered, on two wheels.  None of this spinny wheel thing, I’d break those suckers right off.  Both weighed in at 70 pounds and had large straps holding them together.

I made it on the earlier flight to Newark, in spite of the hour and a half air traffic control hold for weather.  Apparently they hadn’t closed Newark airport, in spite of 60 mile an hour gusting winds, but were just spreading out the planes coming in.  We took off, and all was well until landing.  I started looking for the barf bag in the seat pocket.  Everyone was holding on tight while the plane pitched in the wind, I have to give a lot of credit those two United pilots who got that plane safely on the ground.  We sat on the tarmac awhile waiting for a ground crew of marshals to escort us in and I described the plane rocking back and forth in the wind, just sitting on the tarmac like two hippies doing it in a VW Microbus.  By now it is about 11pm, two hours earlier than I was originally scheduled to land, and to my complete surprise and extreme joy, my bags came zipping down the chute of the baggage carousel.  United, you made me very happy.

And so, I had only a couple days for the final prep for the recorder concert I’ve been working on for the last year for Montclair Early Music.  The Rembrandt concert, shows the life and artwork of Rembrandt along with music of his time.  Not having rehearsed with the group for the last month because I’ve been on the road made me a little nervous.  The concert was yesterday, and just about everything went wrong like my windshield wiper flying off the car in the middle of a torrential rain storm on the way to the concert, not having a long enough extension cord, finding the 19th century church building where the concert was held didn’t have a three prong outlet, but once all of that was worked out, with only minutes to spare before showtime, the program went off without a hitch.  I did the narration and played bass, some of the photos surfaced this morning and I’ll post them here.

Meanwhile, the Jockey Hollow Show and Sale is coming up November 9-10.  During the evenings at Sievers, I had brought a bunch of scraps from old work and created a number of small bags to sell at the guild sale.  I continued that, now that I’m back and have been making a bag a day, I’m really having fun watching YouTube tutorials and seeing all the ways that people put together zippered bags.

Final prep for the Outer Banks retreat, I leave on Saturday!  Last retreat of the year.  I’m so tired!  My daughter is going with me on this one.

Stay tuned…

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The merry-go-round is going too fast…

…and all I can do is hold on to my painted pony for dear life…

The last couple of weeks have been so chocked full of drama and intensity that I’m not even sure where to begin.  My daughter and I joke that if you can’t write a great blog post about it, it isn’t worth doing…

Seems like a century ago, though it was really only a couple of weeks ago, I actually got a weekend get-away with my beloved sisters “down the shore” a strictly NJ term for heading east to the Atlantic coast.  I grew up summering at the Jersey Shore, Ocean City specifically, Mac and Manco’s pizza on the boardwalk, Kohr Bros Ice Cream, Crabs and Beer, Miniature Golf, and of course the boardwalk and the beach.  It was absolutely perfect, we had a lovely stay at the Blue Water Inn, an old sort of Victorian, close to everything, with an awesome veranda where we got take out and played board games late into the evening.  We are crossing our fingers we can do it again next September.

It was just a few short days later I was on a plane to Seattle, and then a long drive to the top of Washington State, where I gave a lecture to the Whatcom Guild on What to Do with Leftovers.  We had some time to wander the town and have a bite to eat and check out a few shops.  I did a bit of damage in the sale rack at a local boutique…

We headed down to Whidbey Island, crossing through Deception Pass, where I settled into a conference center, along with my 15 students for the week long intensive Willow Pond Garment Construction Retreat.  We all lived and worked and ate and shared together, and it was especially fun because many of the students have taken classes with me before so it was like old home week.  The space for the classroom was wonderful.

And the students dove right in.  Many had handwoven fabric.

Unfortunately, living that close and sharing everything, we seemed to all share a respiratory virus that spread like wildfire.  I held off until the trip home, but I have to give all these guys credit for hanging in there, sometimes late into the night, feeling pretty crappy.  In spite of feeling lousy, there were some amazing garments to come out of this retreat.

Toni on the left came to make another vest, but this one, she is planning to piece together her fabulous collection of fabrics and trims.  Molly made a similar vest in a previous class, and unfortunately the antique kimono silk she used for the band and much of the binding dry rotted right out of the piece.  So Molly spend some time carefully removing all of the offending silk and replaced it with more stable cloth and a new handwoven band.

We had a few ladies making tunics, that’s Linda on the left, using a fabric she had in her stash from a trip to South America.  JD is really a felter but wanted to dry run a tunic in regular cloth before digging in with some felt laminate.  And Val got her handwoven tunic finished in time to start another garment from some fabulous handwoven cloth from her stash.

Rose spent much of her time tracing patterns and reworking and finishing up a vest from a garment construction class with a different teacher.  It is always unfortunate when students don’t finish a piece, but she was thrilled to be on her way and we had the pleasure of her constant companion Hope to keep us smiling.

Sue made a gorgeous jacket from her handwoven and I’m thinking if I remember correctly handspun yarn, and Susan brought some commercial fabric because well, life got in the way of finishing her cloth.  We debated for a number of days about the neck band, she bought a beautiful grey wool to coordinate with the jacket fabric, and we loved the border printing so much she went for it and decided to put it front and center on top of the band.  Just needs sleeves.

Jodi and Cheryl both made my new zippered jacket with a collar.  They got to test my new directions.  They did really well.  At the time of the photos, they still had some finishing on the trim, but they both came out fantastic.  Both are handwoven.  In addition, Cheryl, who has worked with me before and made a swing coat a couple of years ago, shortened the pattern and left off the sleeves and made an adorable swing vest.  I can’t wait to try this myself.

Janet is making the regular zip vest, which will be completely trimmed in blue corduroy like the seam finish once the collar and zipper are in.  Maryann made a lovely collared jacket with a wow lining, and Lisa wove a spectacular fabric to make a short duster coat.

And of course Dori.  I’ve worked with Dori before, and she has been taking sewing lessons since I last saw her.  She was on her game!  Dori wove her fabric with a Kathrin Weber/Blazing Shuttles warp and there was a lot of social media buzz about this handwoven fabric before she came.  The warp wasn’t very long, so we had to do some creative cutting and piecing, but she stayed with it and we both squealed in delight when she finished.  

And here is my wonderful Willow Pond Retreat, 2019.

And then that happened…  (You thought I was done…  Nah, I’m just getting started!)

Thursday before the class ended I woke up to a frantic text from my daughter complaining of severe palpable abdominal pain, nausea, and I immediately thought, OMG, her appendix.  Sure enough, in the middle of the final prep for the Peters Valley Craft Fair, they rushed her to the hospital where she underwent emergency surgery to have her appendix removed. According to the doctor it was a very angry appendix and had been for a long time.  Credit to the staff at Peters Valley for staying with her through the surgery.

I will say that as much as I travel, there is always the fear that something will happen at home where I’m needed, and in this case, being on an island 3000 miles away, there wasn’t a damned thing I could do but try to find someone to take my place.  My beloved sisters dropped everything and raced to help, and the gratitude I have is immeasurable.  My Maryland sister drove in the dark, four hours to get to the hospital soon after my daughter woke from anesthesia, through the fog and the Delaware Water Gap, and I will be forever grateful.  My other sister relieved her on Friday so she could get home and to the theater for a show she professionally costumed. Social media is a wonderful thing, once I posted about the situation, about a dozen friends were ready to jump into action as well.  It takes a village and no man or woman is an island.  Knowing there were so many who cared was a life affirming experience for me who occasionally feels like I’m driving the bus alone since my husband’s death. 

So Friday night, a week ago, (wait, it gets better…) I hopped on a plane, the red eye, home to NJ.  I did not sleep of course, even though I was in first class, so I was able to take advantage of the one thing I adore flying home on a red eye, dawn over Manhattan as we come in for a landing.  

I pulled in in the limo at 8:30am, my sister left at 8:40am, and Brianna and I were on the road to the Peters Valley Craft Fair at 9am, because she was committed to be there and couldn’t drive of course.  I know you are all going to tell us we were both nuts.  But we are both professionals with my family’s work ethic, and if there is any way to see through a promise, we will make that happen.  Brianna has worked at the Valley all summer and would have been devastated to miss this event.  They gave her a comfy chair and she worked the cash register all day in the Peters Valley booth while I wandered around and got into a lot of trouble.  Yeah, this happened…

It is coming in December.  IP Furniture Designs.  72″ table and six chairs.  The most comfortable wooden chairs I’ve ever sat in.

I drove Brianna home Saturday evening, and returned the next morning for day 2, left her there, and by Sunday night she was able to drive herself home.

Meanwhile, I prepped for this weekend, and cursed myself for my complete stupidity in signing up for a three day workshop in some fiddly technique with my guild.  What could I have been thinking considering I’m just back from WA and getting on a plane Tuesday morning at 5:30am for a seven day Garment Construction Intensive at Sievers on Washington Island, WI.  

But again, when I commit to something I will see it through if it kills me.  Of course I’m sick from the virus I caught in WA, and I dragged myself and all the looms and equipment to the guild meeting Wednesday night, because of course both my daughter and I had signed up and she couldn’t lift anything heavier than a water jug.

The speaker was Deb Silver.  I had only recently become aware of her and her fantastic work, she had a piece in Complexity, the Complex Weavers Show in an nearby gallery during Convergence Reno in 2018.  She has a new book out on her technique called Split Shed Weaving.  I had no idea what it really entailed, except my guild was sponsoring the workshop and it sounded fiddly.

Deb was fantastic.  I can’t say enough about her work, her organization, her preparedness, and her gentle nature, her samples and handouts are generous and fabulous.  And yes, this technique, done completely on a four shaft loom, is fiddly and it turned out the be the perfect remedy for a merry-go-round that was spinning out of control.  I am above all a handweaver, and the world does truly stop when I concentrate at the loom.  It is one of the reasons why we do what we do.  I sat quietly in the corner, so as not to infect anyone with my virus, and that allowed me to concentrate on some really amazing samples…  (And by lunchtime the first day of the workshop I felt remarkably better)

The first sample was with a single shuttle, split shed work, Han Damask.  Deb provided a number of simple designs that would show off the techniques.

Then we tried a double weft in a broken twill, weaving on opposites.

The next sample was a summer winter, this one pairs, and I can’t believe I didn’t start with the pattern color in the header…  Duh…

This afternoon, I tried summer winter polychrome, combining two pattern shuttles for shading.

 

And of course later this afternoon my daughter unwound her samples so the class could Ohhhh and Ahhhh and take copious pictures.  

There is still one more day of class, and I have already started a lotus in split shed double weave.  The world has slowed down enough for me to actually sit properly on my painted pony and enjoy the ride…  I have a whole ‘nother 48 hours before I get on another plane…

Stay tuned…

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Entertaining at home…

I spent a glorious weekend with my sisters “down the shore”, and if you are friends with me on facebook you will have seen all of those very cool photos of us having a Jersey shore experience.  This morning when I woke up I had a bunch of pictures in my inbox from Ann Marie Soto, extraordinary member of ASG, or the American Sewing Guild, editor of the former Notions Magazine, and luckily for us in the area, member of the North Jersey Chapter of the guild.  

A week ago Saturday, one of the ASG neighborhood groups, the Sewphisticates, who are primarily focused on clothing, chose a studio visit and trunk show with me for their September meeting.  A half dozen members crowded into my studio to have a look at what I do and where I work, and a peak into my “closet” of handwoven clothing.  We stood around the table, and I got rare photos of me actually talking and explaining and telling stories, and this morning Ann Marie sent them along.  They are colorful and fun and though I took not a single image the whole day, she captured some lovely ones.

 

We started in the studio, gathered around the couple of looms with stuff actually on them.  Few had any real weaving experience, so understanding how cloth was woven is an important piece of information if you sew.

We looked at yarn, the beginning of ideas for how my designs are planned.  These are all hand dyed wools and mohairs.  I’m itching to figure out something that will celebrate these colors.

I showed them some yardage, and of course, Chaos, draft available here, designed from some random skeins I had used as dye mops (soaking up leftover dye from another job) and included a warp chain made from a similar dyed “dye mop” skein ready for the next yardage on the loom.

I showed the Autumn Patchwork duster, along with Chaos, which had just returned from an exhibit in Tennessee.  The colors are pretty impressive when I look at them in this kind of photo.  When I’m working on something, I get too close to it, and don’t realize the bigger picture.

We all headed to my office, where I had another loom, with yardage using Noro Taiyo Lace as the weft, and I unrolled it for them to see the beautiful color gradations.  

Then we headed down to the dining room, where I had set up a half dozen Structo’s and gave them the basics of how thread interlacement works, plain weave vs. twill, and they were soon weaving away.  

We had lunch on the decks and by the pond, and then I showed a number of my garments so they could see construction and finishing techniques.  We had a wonderful time.  I was so thrilled for the opportunity to show off what I do all day, to have an excuse to actually get out of my pajamas and entertain.  The animals were adorable if a bit obnoxious, Ranger just didn’t know what to do with himself with all these ladies around!  Very large frozen marrow bones helped keep them outside for a good chunk of time…

Anyway, I’m appreciative of the lovely photos Ann Marie sent, and that I was actually around to be able to host a neighborhood group of the ASG.  They do some lovely field trips, and I was glad I could be one of them!

Heading to the Pacific Northwest at the end of the week!  

Stay tuned…

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Shopping In The Attic…

A long time ago, seems like another lifetime, I gave up ten years of craft fairs and production work, because 1) I was so burned out I didn’t want to weave anymore and 2) I was pregnant in my mid 30’s with my first child.  He turns 30 in February.  It was a long time ago.  Talk about an abrupt life style change…  As much as I can’t imagine my life without my children, especially since my husband is gone, those early years were tough.  I had my daughter just about three years after my son.  So most of my 30’s was about raising kids and desperately trying to recreate myself creatively, incredibly challenging.  For many years the looms stayed fallow.  It was just too hard to set up a loom, be uninterrupted without paying someone to watch my kid/kids while puttered away designing and threading.  And without the source of craft fair income, it was had to justify yarn purchases.  

But I had scrap.  Boy did I have scrap.  Handwoven yardage that is.  I was able to recreate myself and make use of lots of those scraps in the years my children were young because it is easier to be interrupted at the sewing machine than at the loom.  I’ve talked about this before, because a few years ago I started looking at all that scrap in the attic and downsized a bit, especially the early fabrics by making one pound packages and selling them off.  Those are all gone, but there is still a lot up there, and more recent work has netted me some pretty fantastic colorful scraps that I can do some pretty fantastic stuff with…

Sidebar…

I’m heading to Whidbey Island next Friday with a stop off in Bellingham, WA to give a lecture to the Whatcom Guild.  They chose to have my lecture on what to do with Leftovers.  I haven’t given that one in a year or two, and it was really lovely to go through and pull all the ingredients for the lecture, because when I teach someplace where I have to fly, I have to ship a lot of stuff ahead.  The “ingredients” or samples and examples for the Leftovers lecture won’t fit in the suitcases I need for the five day garment construction retreat on Whidbey Island so they all have to be shipped head as well.  And because this is the Pacific Northwest, and I live in the Northeast, I have to give lots of lead time for stuff to get there.  Which means a lot of preplanning and prepping.  So earlier this week, I focused on cutting and printing and binding and packing everything I need for both the retreat and the Leftovers lecture, which made me go through the content of the Leftovers lecture and remind me why this topic is so much fun.  Everything has been shipped out and I have some time to kill…

The fun part for me is that I already have all the “ingredients” for a lifetime of playing with handwoven pieces that are really just trash.  The garment they came from is finished and somewhere in my closet or sold.  I only have one venue a year where I can sell things I make from scraps, and there isn’t a whole lot of money to be made, once the guild takes its percentage, but still, my Jockey Hollow Weavers Guild show and sale in November is a pretty strong venue if I take the time to actually make stuff.

So I have a week or so before I fly out to Seattle, and the prep work for the workshop is done, and I pulled a large pile of miscellaneous stuff from my attic, and set out to see what I could come up with.

I’m seeing a lot of images of bags and items on social media that use my long ago developed technique for piecing.  All you have to do is show a person or two the technique, in a class or lecture and social media spreads it like wild fire…  I’ve already made two bags and sold them immediately at the guild sale last year, and this last one used the remaining bits.  The technique uses a tricot backing, scraps are fused to the backing with cut edges butting together, and the joins are covered by bias tubes using a duct tie as a press bar.  I’ve documented the process along with the rest of the technique suggestions in my “What to Do with Leftovers” monograph. 

I also found a very large hunk of a woven piece I did years ago featured in a Handwoven Magazine article, using a Theo Moorman inlay technique with Pendleton Woolen Mill “worms” or blanket selvedges (I shipped home a couple of bales from the mill during a tour after the Pendleton Oregon ANWG conference back in 2005 I think).  I wove them in using tie down threads on a wool background using up stuff on my shelves.  This made for a great two sided fabric and it was a perfect candidate and just the right size to squeak out a vest from my collared vest pattern.  No need for a yoke since the “worms” changed color midway up the scrap. Here is the link to the original coat, long ago sold to my favorite customer.

And I made another padded zipper pouch last night, with a leftover piece from last year’s dishtowel run.  The piece wasn’t enough for a full dishtowel, and not really the right size for a napkin. I showed the first one I made a couple blog posts ago I think.  There are a boat load of YouTube videos from quilters on making zippered pouches, though I’m having issues with my serger, this still came out quite lovely.  (Note to self: figure out what’s wrong with the serger, changing needles didn’t help…)

And I got the idea of making greeting cards out of the smaller scraps, from some I got from a guild or conference tote or something.  I ordered a bunch of Strathmore blanks with envelopes and cello sleeves  and my daughter immediately stole all of them and made them into cards so she could sell them at the sale.  Her scraps are infinitely more interesting than mine, but I’ll have competition at the guild this year for greeting cards.  Hoping people still send snail mail greetings…

And of course there is nothing like a deadline.  

Additional sidebar…

I am a huge fan of the Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey, their productions are incredible, and I always try to attend their annual gala fundraisers whenever I’m actually in town.  This October they are hosting another fund raiser, with requisite tricky tray, called “A Bard’s Barbeque“.  I’ve donated my handwoven scarves to their tricky tray in the past, but the BBQ theme needed something different.  I spoke with one of their development directors about donating a couple of handwoven dishtowels, you know, the Lady Macbeth “Out damned spot” kind of thing.  They loved it but it means I have to clear the loom of the 14 dishtowels to get two for them before I leave for WA next Friday.  No pressure. 

I think I just finished number nine…

And while I had my morning tea, I leafed through the new Shuttle, Spindle and Dyepot that has been sitting on the table for a week now.  It has the conference registration for next year’s Convergence in Knoxville, TN, and I’m not on the roster by choice.  I didn’t apply to the conference because, well if you have been following my blog you know that I’m not interested in doing conferences anymore.  That said, I was surprised as I leafed through the magazine, to find myself on page 25, or rather my coat, which I had forgotten had won the coveted HGA award back in 2018 and was featured in a spread in the magazine that featured all the HGA award winners from last year.

I read on, and was surprised again to see me, like a picture of me, on page 7 of the conference registration book, because I’m one of the invited fashion show artists.  There are three of us invited, I was the juror for the fashion show in Reno in 2018, and now, I’ll be sending five pieces of work, so my work will be there, just not me.  Talk about a serious deadline…

And then I really was surprised when I turned to page 44, almost at the end, and saw a lovely ad featuring my dress, it was an HGA ad for Professional Membership.  I have this vague recollection of the editor asking permission to use my piece in something…  The ad is beautiful.  And of course I’m a professional member…

Nice to be featured prominently in a magazine without actually having to write anything!

Stay tuned…

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One down, three to go…

I am teaching four garment construction retreats this fall, the first is finished, I just returned from a six day class in Harrisville, NH, home of Harrisville Designs.  I love teaching there, I had a particularly delightful class, they all got along well, helped each other, were supportive of each other, and all pledged to come back next year.  And they really really worked hard.  One of the advantages to places like this and like Sievers in Wisconsin (trip number 3) is that students can work well in to the night.  Some of my students are early morning risers, and they can start at 6am, and many of them don’t get cranking until after dinner.  It wasn’t unusual for me to stay and cheer them on until 11pm at night.  

Anyway, I had 12 students, four of them were repeaters, so they kind of worked on their own agenda.  Carole and Jane made garments from my patterns…  Both from handwovens…  Jane tried the new button down placket version of my tunic, with in seam buttonholes.

Amy and Rita brought their own patterns and Amy’s 1st jacket and both of Rita’s jackets were from handwoven.  

Tracey is a felter, and brought some felt laminate (wool felted onto silk) panels she made, and created a swing coat using the “living” edge of the felt as hems and borders.  I always called it the organic natural edge of the felt, but I like her term better.  She also had time to create my new swing dress/jumper from a commercial raw silk she brought along as plan B.

Sally and Polly made swing coats.  Both are handwoven, and Polly was a little further behind because she brought a plaid.  A handwoven plaid, and of course in a handwoven plaid, nothing matches up even though it was woven thread perfect.  She spent a lot of hours at the cutting table.  I cannot wait to see this one finished.

Leslie and Roberta made regular jackets, Leslie of course spent many extra hours cutting out her commercial plaid, she did a wonderful job, but ran out of time for things like bands and sleeves!  Roberta worked well into the evenings and was able to mostly finish hers. Roberta’s fabric is a gorgeous handwoven from Tencel.

And I had so much fun with Dee-Dee.  She wove a gorgeous mock leno wool fabric from combining Harrisville Shetland and Highland yarns.  There were a few challenging moments, and she added a very cool design to the pocket, but her tenacity showed and she got most of the jacket completed by the sixth day.

Betty turns out, worked for me many years ago, in the 1980’s when I did craft fairs, it was good to reconnect with her.  She brought commercial wool and made a terrific version of my collared zip vest, with a little assistance in the evenings!

And Peggy, I’ve known for many years, she regularly exhibits her work at conferences and is a pretty terrific garment maker and a heck of a weaver.  She brought a whole box full of things to work on, from tweaking the fit on garments she had already made, to creating one of my collared zip vests.  It was a joy to work with her as well.

And so  here is the class of Fall 2019 at Harrisville, taken a day early because a couple only stayed for the five days and didn’t need to take advantage of the extra sixth day.  The friendships that developed really showed, and I was very proud of this class.  

Peggy took a fun shot of me teaching during one of the lectures, I almost never have photos of me!

And for those that are interested, my five Handwoven Magazine webinars on Garment construction have found their new home through Long Thread Media.  Links to each of the five webinars can be found on my schedule page.  

And my latest video is up on Threads Magazine.  This one is included in their free essentials video series, it is all about stay stitching, something every weaver should memorize and anyone who sews garments should be aware of and be proficient at…

Trip number two of four is coming up fast, this one to the opposite corner of the US, Whidbey Island.

Stay tuned…

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